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Aug 17

In Your Own Words

In Your Own Words

(For a group you will need the correct number of copies of the speeches which are reproduced below * to*)

Take one of the Shakespeare speeches, Polonius’ speech to his son Laertes as he is about to leave to live in Paris, from ‘Hamlet’.
or
‘All the world’s a stage…’ a melancholic description of life from ‘As You Like It’
and put it into ‘your own words’ as it might be expressed today.
Give it a ‘voice’ an accent, regional or class etc.

Take the other speech and express the sentiments as they might have been put in another period; you might choose the 1920s or 40s or perhaps a hippy from the 1970s….
Have fun with them – you don’t have to just paraphrase; get the gist and then put it across as it would be expressed.
If you are doing this in a group, share, and see if you can guess the periods chosen and discuss
(This is good practice at setting the time, and possibly place through a speaker).

If time ,or as a homework, try expressing the ideas from one of the speeches as a short poem or limerick.

*
LORD POLONIUS

Yet here, Laertes! aboard, aboard, for shame!
The wind sits in the shoulder of your sail,
And you are stay’d for. There; my blessing with thee!
And these few precepts in thy memory
See thou character. Give thy thoughts no tongue,
Nor any unproportioned thought his act.
Be thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel;
But do not dull thy palm with entertainment
Of each new-hatch’d, unfledged comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel, but being in,
Bear’t that the opposed may beware of thee.
Give every man thy ear, but few thy voice;
Take each man’s censure, but reserve thy judgment.
Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
But not express’d in fancy; rich, not gaudy;
For the apparel oft proclaims the man,
And they in France of the best rank and station
Are of a most select and generous chief in that.
Neither a borrower nor a lender be;
For loan oft loses both itself and friend,
And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all: to thine ownself be true,
And it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
Farewell: my blessing season this in thee!

******************

JACQUES
All the world’s a stage,
And all the men and women merely players;
They have their exits and their entrances,
And one man in his time plays many parts,
His acts being seven ages. At first, the infant,
Mewling and puking in the nurse’s arms.
Then the whining schoolboy, with his satchel
And shining morning face, creeping like snail
Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
Made to his mistress’ eyebrow. Then a soldier,
Full of strange oaths and bearded like the pard,
Jealous in honor, sudden and quick in quarrel,
Seeking the bubble reputation
Even in the cannon’s mouth. And then the justice,
In fair round belly with good capon lined,
With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
Full of wise saws and modern instances;
And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
Into the lean and slippered pantaloon,
With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
His youthful hose, well saved, a world too wide
For his shrunk shank, and his big manly voice,
Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
That ends this strange eventful history,
Is second childishness and mere oblivion,
Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.

William Shakespeare
*

Blog 63 (Category:Fun Activity) Tags:Language,Styles,Appropriate Language

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